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Should You Try Botox for Premature Ejaculation?

If premature ejaculation (PE) is haunting your sex life, you may be searching for any solution science can offer — but are you ready to inject Botox down there? Bottom line: It's probably not safe.

Yes, studies are showing that injecting Botox — the same stuff people use for their wrinkles and frown lines — may help with PE. “Studies have found that injecting Botox in the bulbospongiosus muscle of the penis can help delay ejaculation. The bulbospongiosus muscle is a superficial muscle which normally helps with erections, organism, and ejaculation,” says plastic surgeon Dr. David Shafer.

The mechanism of Botox is to temporarily relax muscles by disrupting the signaling between nerves and muscles where it is injected. When you use Botox on your forehead or the area around your eyes, it works to reduce surface wrinkles caused by contractions of underlying muscles. “The use of Botox for the treatment of PE would work by the same mechanism of relaxing contractions of the muscle and thus delay ejaculation,” says Dr. Shafer.

“Botox is frequently used in urology for injection into the bladder. This treats a variety of problems with bladder control, urinary frequency, and urinary incontinence," says Jonathan L. Masel, M.D., F.A.C.S., a Board Certified Urologist at the Masel Urology Center in Hollywood, Florida. (This treatment is most commonly used for older patients and those with neurological issues.)

“Premature Ejaculation is a specific sexual problem defined as reaching ejaculation quickly after vaginal penetration, usually in less than one to three minutes," says Dr. Masel. PE could stem from a variety of causes (its origins aren't completely understood) and variety of accepted treatments currently include medications, behavioral therapy, and sex counseling.

Dr. Masel cautions that as of yet, Botox is not an accepted treatment for PE at this time. “There are two published studies investigating the use of Botox to possibly treat PE by injecting it into rats and assessing their ejaculatory function. Botox does appear to prolong the time to ejaculation in rats,” says Dr. Masel.

Of course these rats were not complaining of PE, says Dr. Masel, so this isn’t the same quite yet as using the injection to treat humans. “There is one research study ongoing to accrue human subjects to investigate the use of Botox to impact ejaculatory function. There is no established treatment technique or dosage for using Botox to treat PE in humans in 2016,” says Dr. Masel who is of the opinion it would be unwise for a man to have a Botox injection to treat PE outside of a research study at this point in time. “Men should also be careful that advertised centers offering Botox injections for PE may actually be injecting something other than real Botox,” says Dr. Masel.

This isn’t the first time that Botox has been used for sexual, rather than aesthetic, reasons. Women who have issues with painful sex have been known to inject Botox into the walls of their vagina.

Still, this likely won't be a legit treatment for PE anytime soon as it's not yet an authorized on-label use for Botox. Besides, would you really want a needle stuck into your groin?

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There is a new solution coming up for ugly old women. Normally they would just become man-hating feminists. But soon they can have their brains transplanted into a sex doll, and feel beautiful again.

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PEDOPHILE SOUTH KOREAN DIPLOMAT CAUSES INTERNATIONAL INCIDENT WITH CHILE

ROK Drop

A South Korean diplomat in Chile accused of sexually assaulting teenage girls was summoned home, Tuesday, to face questioning by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, according to diplomatic sources. “The diplomat returned home early this morning in accordance with the ministry’s summons,” the source said on condition of anonymity.

The diplomat, named Park Jeong-hak, was in charge of promoting K-pop at the Korean Embassy to Chile. He was accused of making improper physical contact with a 14-year-old Chilean girl in September while teaching Korean.

Park’s inappropriate actions were made public after a Chilean broadcaster aired, Sunday (local time), film of him sexually abusing an actress disguised as a teenage girl captured by a hidden camera. The broadcaster planned the program, in which it had the actress deliberately lure him, after receiving a tip-off from the parents of a victim.

After the airing of the program called “En Su Propia Trampa” (In Your Own Trap), which sparked public fury in the Latin American country, Yoon Seo-ho, a Korean immigrant who has lived in Chile for 12 years, told a CBS radio program, Tuesday, that the diplomat had been notorious for his sexual offenses even before the program was aired.

The diplomat was also accused of raping a 12-year-old girl as well as sexually harassing the Chilean wife of a Korean immigrant, Yoon said. [Korea Times]

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95 percent of the victims of violence are men. Because women are natural cowards who send men to handle things when they are dangerous.

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Plastic surgery report: Demand for designer vaginas fastest-growing here

KUALA LUMPUR, Feb 26 — Demand for designer vagina procedures in Malaysia skyrocketed in comparison to other plastic surgery treatments, a report by private healthcare search engine WhatClinic.com has indicated.

In explaining the triple digit growth of almost 200 per cent in interest for the laser vaginal rejuvenation procedure, the report highlighted the relatively fuss-free nature of the treatment to tighten the vagina.

“The treatment is relatively pain free and the patient can return to a normal day to day routine very soon after,” the clinic comparison site’s annual global report said.

In its analysis of 10,290 email enquiries to over 100 Malaysian clinics made through the online clinic directory site over the past two years, WhatClinic.com’s data showed a whopping 191 per cent jump in interest in the laser vaginal rejuvenation procedure in Malaysia with a leap from 103 enquiries in 2015 to 300 in 2016.

At an average starting price of RM2,575 based on last year’s figures, laser vaginal rejuvenation is also the cheapest among the country’s top 10 plastic surgery treatments WhatClinic.com users enquired about.

Based on both enquiries locally and from abroad, liposuction which removes excess body fat attracted the greatest interest with 1,201 enquiries alone last year, while eyelid surgery and the procedure to shift body fat to another part of the body were also in the top three list last year at 577 and 563 enquiries respectively.

In terms of percentage, however, interest in seven out of the top 10 treatments sought by patients fell at an average rate of 20.8 per cent when compared against the previous year, including liposuction and eyelid surgery which fell by 32 per cent and 19 per cent, as well as breast implants (-26 per cent) and rhinoplasty to reshape the nose (-24 per cent).

It is unclear how big a role pricing plays in these trends, as the average starting price last year for the seven treatments that experienced a fall in interest mostly fall in the range of RM7,833 to RM17,874 with only one of them at RM4,400 (eyelid surgery).

Two of the three treatments in the list showing growing popularity had average starting prices of RM8,723 (gynecomastia or treatment to correct enlarged male breasts) and RM8,736 (fat transfer) as compared to rising star laser vaginal rejuvenation at RM2,575.

Weighing in on the interest levels in Malaysia’s plastic surgery services, WhatClinic.com said: “We haven’t seen a huge increase overall, in fact there was a 4 per cent decrease in interest in plastic surgery when we compared the past three months to the same period one year ago—however there has been growth from overseas in some treatments.”

The young ones

Out of the 4,777 email enquiries last year for local plastic surgery services, the bulk of them came from those in the younger age groups of 25 to 34 at 43 per cent and 35 to 44 at 20 per cent respectively, with demand gradually decreasing from these two age groups onwards. Those in the 18 to 24 age group represent the third largest group by accounting for 18 per cent of the enquiries.

“The demographics are consistent with global trends of recent. Digitally connected millennials are bombarded with more and more ‘versions’ of beauty by brands and their peers. This causes pressure to achieve the best possible look,” Philip Boyle, WhatClinic’s Head of Consumer Matters, told Malay Mail Online.

Although women continued to dominate last year in terms of number of enquiries made for plastic surgery services in Malaysia at 70 per cent, WhatClinic.com noted that the number of men seeking such treatments has seen a “sharp increase” over the past few years, predicting that the balance will shift in the future.

US and Australia loving it

Medical tourists from Australia, US and the UK showed growing interest in plastic surgery services in Malaysia, with an annual growth last year of 10 per cent, 32 per cent and 6 per cent respectively, while the two other countries in the top five list — neighbours Singapore and Indonesia — showed lesser demand with a fall of 21 per cent and 34 per cent respectively.

Boyle cited “currency advantages” for Malaysia’s popularity among visitors from Australia and the US, while WhatClinic.com predicted that the strong growth figures from Australia meant the trend from that country was likely to continue.

“The US is Malaysia’s fastest growing medical tourism market, growing 32 per cent in the past 12 months. This has no doubt been influenced by the weakening ringgit (MYR) against the dollar (USD),” the report said.

WhatClinic.com also attributed Malaysia’s popularity for plastic surgery to government initiatives to promote the country as a medical tourism destination, as well as the improved quality and reputation of Malaysian plastic surgeons.

As for the plastic surgery treatment in Malaysia favoured by medical tourists, liposuction was the firm favourite last year with its 409 enquiries. This is almost twice as many as the second on the list, rhinoplasty at 209 enquiries.

This was followed by breast implants, fat transfer and eyelid surgery, with the latter showing a marked decline of 28 per cent from 221 enquiries in 2015 to 160 enquiries last year.

“Fat transfer appears to be the treatment of the year, experiencing 2.2x growth in the 12 months to January 2017,” the report said, referring to the growth of 120 per cent from 89 enquiries in 2015 to 196 enquiries last year.

What is ‘beauty’ now?

Boyle said the treatment trends reflect consumer interest, with more showing a preference for safer treatments such as fat transfer — which is less risky due to the use of the patients’ own cells.

For the star treatments of laser vaginal rejuvenation and fat transfer, Boyle cited “increased availability, increased awareness, word of mouth” as factors driving the demand for these procedures in Malaysia.

Commenting on the decline in demand for some treatments such as liposuction, eyelid surgery and rhinoplasty, Boyle said: “There are now more non-surgical options than ever before—fat freezing and the non-surgical nose jobs are now available as less invasive, and more affordable options.”

Boyle also told Malay Mail Online that the change in demand for certain types of plastic surgery procedures is linked to both affordability and a change in the sense of beauty.

“We have seen global trends for butt implants and fuller thicker eyebrows (which many have attributed to popular celebrities and models) We have also seen in the UK, smaller breast implants, as more and more women become interested in fitness. Laser hair removal has become extremely popular.

“We have also seen growth in demand for eyelid and chin surgeries.

“All of these are linked to changes in what ‘beauty’ means. Not to mention the medical aesthetic market, which is bringing out things like vampire facials and fat freezing to consumers,” he said.

(A vampire facial is where a person’s own platelet rich plasma is injected into her face to help the skin renew and rejuvenate.)

The next big hit?

“Hair transplant is overtaking breast augmentation as the fastest growing plastic surgery procedure. It’s also being used to repair eyebrows, and fill patchy beards!” Boyle said.

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Restore freedom: No taxes on alcohol and nicotine. When feminism cripples male sexuality, there must be something else that feels good before we die anyway.

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Homo Obnoxious: Is Toxic Masculinity Really Taking Over the Country?

San Diego Free Press

DECEMBER 26, 2016 BY SOURCE

Maybe the real problem is a lack of positive paths to manhood

It wasn’t supposed to turn out like this. We were said to be approaching the demise of a certain type of swaggering, predatory masculinity: let’s call him Homo Obnoxious.

As men like Roger Ailes, Bill Cosby, Anthony Weiner, and Billy Bush scrambled unsuccessfully to find cover in the old-boy bastions of privilege, Homo Obnoxious appeared to be lumbering around like a dinosaur under the weight of his own cultural baggage. His habitat was shrinking: it seemed as if men who defined themselves by devaluing women, putting down men who didn’t think like them and treating sexual relations — and most everything else — as power-tripping performances might be ready for mounting in a Museum of Masculinity Past.

Books like Hanna Rosin’s The End of Men hailed an era in which women, and men of a different mold, would rapidly pull ahead in every arena. In The Future of Men: Masculinity in the Twenty-First Century, Jack Myers heralded a seismic shift in human relations. “We are entering a new age of female dominance and a reshaping of the male psyche, the male libido, and the male ego,” Myers wrote. “This is the new reality, and it will gain greater and greater momentum. Nothing in the history of humanity can prepare us for this newly upside-down world.”

Reality check: Homo Obnoxious is moving into the White House. The world is upside-down, but not for the reasons Myers anticipated.

The president-elect is signaling to boys across the country what it means to be a successful man. He gets more thuggish with each passing day, appointing knuckle-dragging members of his tribe to run the country. Meanwhile, alt-right dudes who cope with masculine anxiety by proclaiming superiority over women and people of color are feeling validated, enjoying influence they could hardly dream of a year ago. As one self-identified “neomasculine” blogger put it, “I’m in a state of exuberance that we now have a President who rates women on a 1-10 scale in the same way that we do and evaluates women by their appearance and feminine attitude.”

Yikes. But before we concede that toxic masculinity has suddenly reasserted itself as the dominant force in the cultural universe, let’s pause to take a breath. Let’s admit, for example, that although arenas of male experiences differ depending on where you live and how much money you have, Homo Obnoxious was never just a creature of any one party, class or region. The truth is that he is nurtured at every stage of an American boy’s journey into manhood, and without trying to understand what our society does to promote his development and how boys and men might be persuaded to reject his allure, he will continue his rampage across the land.

Let’s take a look at three breeding grounds where Homo Obnoxious cuts his teeth.

The playground

So many have a story like mine. It was a day soon after I had transferred to a new public high school in North Carolina. Two popular senior boys — baseball stars on a winning team — approached me across a crowded stair landing. I smiled, then felt rough hands shove me against the wall as the two sang obscene lyrics in my ear. That was not the last or the most violent encounter I had with Homo Obnoxious-in-training during my education.

Aggressive misogyny, of course, permeates many school sports teams, as the recent case of the men’s soccer team at Harvard illustrates. There, at America’s most hallowed university, a spreadsheet compiled by male players portraying members of the women’s team in degrading sexual terms was brought to light. A student explained the commonplace nature of the behavior to the New York Times: “I think Donald Trump is so extreme that we like to believe that these extreme incidents of sexism and discrimination are, like, isolated to him,” he said. “But it’s important to recognize that they’re just as rampant in our generation.”

Responding to recent revelations of decades-long sex abuse by both faculty and students at St. Georges, a New England prep school where Billy Bush was an ice hockey star, a former student described the warped sexual atmosphere and lack of guidance from adults in a letter to the rector of St. Paul’s, another elite prep school where a tradition of predatory sexual competition bred danger:

“I went to St. George’s School in the ’80s and am a heterosexual, success-oriented, competitive guy. I remember being self-conscious about my not getting any action while some of my male friends got tons. I felt less-than, like a loser when it came to girls and sex…Nowhere in my development …did any adult ever reinforce in me that it is all right to go at your own pace, that sex isn’t competition. The cultural norm was that sex was another place to be competitive, where you could be classified as a winner or a loser.”

Let’s think about that. When competition is the preferred mode of group interaction, it’s no wonder boys end up stuck with obsessions about the number of their sexual encounters and a tendency to degrade the objects of their pursuits.

In A Bigger Prize: Why Competition Isn’t Everything And How We Do Better, Margaret Heffernan discusses the destructive role that competition plays in American education and how it turns kids off of many potentially valuable collaborative activities. A large percentage end up not wanting to participate anything, including sports, in which being the winner or loser is everything.

Heffernan points out that if we teach kids that success is all about individual performance, they grow up to be what she calls “heroic soloists.” In relating to others, they tend to focus on what’s in it for them, suppressing the instinct to be generous or share credit or empathy. Our president-elect, steeped in the values of self-interest capitalism and competition in everything from football and beauty pageants to reality TV tournaments, is the epitome of a heroic soloist — one who has been rewarded richly in celebrity, power and money.

Teaching kids the value of creative collaboration and offering rational guidance on sexuality or gender relations at school has to be a part of cultivating a different path to manhood. American sex education, for example, if it is taught at all, often consists of either shaming abstinence lessons or alarming medical discussions of STDs and pregnancy, with little acknowledgment of the need to develop compassionate ways to express sexuality or the importance of challenging sexual stereotypes in media and culture. It doesn’t have to be that way; in a New York Times op-ed, Pamela Druckerman highlighted how topics like the complexity of love are openly discussed in French sex-ed, while Dutch teachers work to inculcate respect for people who don’t fit traditional sexual and gender molds.

If they don’t have blueprints of masculinity that allow for confidence and strength without domination in the playground and in the classroom, boys grow up thinking that a hero is somebody who is in everything solely for himself. This does not mean that we send male students to re-education boot camps, as certain right-wing pundits have warned is the true agenda of coastal elites. It means that adults take it upon themselves to guide students, whatever their sexual orientation or gender identity, in imagining ways of being men that are not destructive to themselves and others. It means not shaming them because they are male, but rather encouraging them to develop pride in characteristics and values that are socially beneficial, like putting others before themselves, honesty and strength in caring and self-restraint. That would be a start.

The campus

When I arrived at the University of Georgia in 1988, a sophomore from my hometown issued a helpful warning not to ever hook up in a certain popular fraternity house. The guys, I was informed, videotaped girls through holes in the walls and watched the tapes together on Sunday morning. This foreshadowing of the age of digital shaming and abuse was my introduction to the group norms associated with Greek life. Some misogynist rituals were performed under the radar, but others were out in the open and normalized, from parties where lists trashing women in sexual terms were posted on walls to “mixers” with sororities in which fraternity guys inscribed phalluses and misogynist phrases on the T-shirts of freshman girls.

There is nothing wrong with guys wanting to hang out, share common interests and form lasting social bonds with one another. But as young men begin to leave home, there aren’t enough opportunities for them to do this in a way that breeds healthy, socially responsible attitudes and behavior. Beyond the sports field, college fraternities are another place where antisocial activity is too often the norm, a lot of it targeting women. The “Animal House” frat image grounded in the degradation of women, based on fraternity life at Dartmouth in the 1960s, has been ascendant for decades, linking manliness to out-drinking peers and egging them on in sexual exploits. (Was Donald Trump in a fraternity? Of course: he was a Phi Gam at Fordham.)

The negative image is based in reality. On alcohol consumption, a U.S. Department of Education’s Higher Education Center survey shows that 75 percent of fraternity members engaged in heavy drinking, compared with 49 percent of other male students. Some — including many college presidents — have argued that since the drinking age was raised to 21, alcohol consumption has gone undercover, causing students to associate drinking with transgression and pushing it far from the supervision of older adults and more open social events. Lowering the drinking age, they suggest, might bring alcohol back into a more normalized atmosphere where students mix with older adults in supervisory roles, thus obviating the need for secretive binge-drinking and its attendant hazards and regression.

Some say fraternities should accept girls, and in a few cases, colleges have banned frats altogether, arguing that they are obsolete. At Amherst in Massachusetts, where fraternities were prohibited in 2014, students and faculty have discussed ways to create social groups that get rid of some of the destructive things associated with fraternities while providing the cohesiveness and sense of belonging that make them attractive, like residential communities with selective membership centered around a particular theme.

This is all well and good, but how likely is it to spread into regions of the country far flung from elite coastal universities? Places where fraternities have emerged as a way of attracting less affluent students to college with the promise of bonding and bacchanalia, to be translated into fundraising dollars after graduation?

College men — and young men who don’t go to college —need to have positive narratives that allow them to feel good about being men and being men together. Challenging sexual assault is important, but they need to learn much more than “no means no”: they need guidance in emotional honesty and intimacy, the challenges of navigating relationships and masculine ideals to strive for in which cultivating large numbers of women as hookups and drinking into oblivion are not the marks of masculine status. Beyond this, they need to see that life offers them more than the prospect of being a loser in the workforce that awaits them when schooling is done, and they also need opportunities to see that work in areas like caregiving, for example, are rich in positive masculine values. When a male nurse can be viewed as stronger and sexier than a Wall Street parasite, we will have gotten somewhere.

Popular culture reflects a hunger for a vision of masculinity that rejects Homo Obnoxious. Jesse Pinkman, the young meth cook in the TV series Breaking Bad, illustrates the despair of recession-era young men without decent job prospects who search for status, meaning, and self-worth. There’s a lot wrong with Jesse, but in his evolution as a character we see his growing resolve to form intimate, caring bonds with the women in his life and the men in his posse, too. The blockbuster franchise Fast and Furious shows the need for even the most testosterone-driven men — racecar drivers in this case — to develop respect and lasting relationships with the men and women in their social group.

These fictional guys hunt for alternatives to a brutal, global capitalist system that casts them as losers. They want to find the dignity that dissolves when we mire them in student debt, consign them to dead-end jobs and say, Oh well, globalization happens. If we continue to do this, they will bond together in ways that can quickly become dangerous to society as a whole, and they will look for outsider narratives that offer something more that the empty promise of upward mobility currently on offer from politicians who think that the paltry social safety net and worker protections currently in place are over-generous (politicians from both major parties). Sometimes, in the case of the white supremacist groups that have begun to creep out of the woodwork, that something will be very scary.

The internet

There has been a lot of recent research on how online porn and video games are helping to inculcate alienation and destructive patterns in boys and young men. Stanford psychologist Philip Zimbardo’s book Man (Dis)Connected): How Technology has Sabotaged What it Means to be Male provides insight onto how Homo Obnoxious gets his brain wired.

Zimbardo discusses how young male brains can become shaped at a cellular level in ways that inhibit their social development through excessive time spent on gaming and porn, even losing their ability to read the social cues of face-to-face contact. Many, he points out, are drawn to these realms as a seemingly safe and easy way to gain a sense of achievement that may not be available in the winner-take-all competition of school and the workforce. These virtual worlds are tailored to provide an addictive system of goals and rewards that produce guys who are afraid of intimacy. They end up eschewing real-world experiments that might result in rejection, and real-time spontaneity that leaves them disoriented and frightened. Drained of self-confidence, they search for narratives of manhood that provide at least the simulacrum of power and dignity.

Some go on to find self-help, intellectual and political forums online collectively termed “the manosphere.” Some of this has merged with the recently designated “alt-right.” In the more benign forums, we find guys like mild-mannered Brian Begin, co-founder of Fearless Man website, who invites guys to join a brotherhood of men who have learned the secret of confidence and self-love. A shy video gamer who found himself working in a miserable office cubicle and unable to talk to women, Begin eventually threw away his games and launched a self-help journey that revealed to him he needed to learn to “feel” — to experience emotions at a deep, visceral level and connect to others despite fear of rejection. Although Begin’s quest for dignified masculinity rests in part on the fantasy of making piles of money and dating beautiful women, his hunger for self-esteem and the experience of genuine emotion seems real, as does his impulse to see women as something other than a collection of body parts. He doesn’t want to be a nervous “beta” male, and while much of his rhetoric is traditionalist and half-baked, he is on to something in pointing to the critical need for connection. In his workshops, the first thing he does is to hug the men who participate.

Unfortunately, much in the manosphere openly promotes the far more noxious stuff, like sexual predation in the pickup community, where guys give each other creepy tips on “mind-controlling” women and duping them into sex. Other sites, like Mensactivism, boil with anger at feminists and take a paranoid stance against what they imagine is an epidemic of false rape claims and women who will take advantage of them at every opportunity. Mensactivism buzzes with articles like “Men are the downtrodden sex” and blogs expressing hope that a Trump presidency “could radically change colleges’ response to sexual assault.” In these sites, loneliness and fear are vented as rage — the rage that comes when people don’t know what to do with their suffering.

Yet for all the bluster and bullying on such sites, you don’t have to dig far to find clues to what is bothering these young men so profoundly at their core. The blogger who likes Trump’s rating system for women asks a series of questions in a meditation on so-called neomasculinity, which despite its name, is mostly a throwback to outdated myths of male superiority: “What code of morality or principles should guide men in their daily lives? Is there a deeper life meaning that can help us set better goals?” The answers he comes up with may be bitter and sad, but the questions themselves are not stupid, and they point to a lack of compass to give direction. Online, the lost boys find each other, making up the missing codes themselves out of a mixture of bravado, hurt and bitterness.

The road ahead

When I sat down to write this article just after Trump’s election, I felt angry and confused swallowing the reality that the country is going to be led by a man who brags about sexual assault. But gradually, I’ve come to feel something else, a sense that the Trump election may in part be a sign that a giant population of American men — particularly the Trump voters but also men across regions and classes — are in turmoil, and that most are looking for a way out. If we simply shout them down and disparage them, we can be pretty sure that the worst among them, the already-committed members of Tribe Homo Obnoxious, will gain strength, not lose it. Some are likely already too far down the road of hate for redemption, but I believe these are a small minority. The rest are struggling, watching, looking for signs, searching for stories that might give them a sense of a more positive path ahead.

Over Thanksgiving, I attended Sunday services at a conservative Southern Baptist megachurch in Raleigh, North Carolina, partly because I wanted to hear and see for myself what men in that context were thinking and talking about it — men who were the most likely in town to have voted for Trump. If I were to believe the assumptions of some of my liberal friends in New York, where I currently live, they would be spewing racial hatred, misogyny and homophobia — a seething collection of “toothless rednecks,” as one New Yorker put it on my Facebook page.

That’s not what I heard. The sermon was delivered by a young minister with the demeanor of a kindly basketball coach, one who was not afraid of emotions and wept at times as he spoke. His message, it seemed to me, was tailored to deliver balm to the heart of hurt manhood. God was the benign father and Christ was a brother — even a lover — who valued those gathered so deeply he would give his life for them. Men were presented as the ones who went out into the world while moms stayed home, a 1950s trope to be sure, but they were also asked to give up their self-centeredness, their narcissism. The minister urged them to see power as something that could be used to confront their own shortcomings, to serve and protect others. The solo adventurer was not vaunted here. Trump was not the emblem of the kind of masculinity valued here.

As much as I reject his outdated gender framework, the minister appeared a man with whom I shared some basic concerns—about the allure of consumerism, for example. He was not an alien, but a person trying to confront the ills of modern society, many of which bother me as much as him, though our emphasis and answers are different.

Men are confused, and how could they not be? Ever since the 1950s brought women into the workforce en masse, and the Pill released them from reproductive shackles in the ‘60s, a profound change in human relations has been happening in painful fits and starts. In the grand scheme of history, a few decades is an incredibly short amount of time to adjust to such a cataclysm. No wonder we’re still flailing about trying to figure out how to cope. Identity, expectations, culture and hormones are a complex dance. Social construction is a dynamic process, and hardly linear.

And let’s face it: Hillary Clinton’s election was not likely to bring a great gender renaissance in America, or any kind of renaissance for that matter. If Clinton were on her way to the White House, there is much reason to believe that ordinary men — and women— would see little improvements in their lives. That would be the case as long as those in charge are stuck in paradigms of dysfunctional capitalism and neoliberal blindness. Anger would continue to fester, and many working-class white men, in particular, would become even more entrenched in their reactionary rage.

As America’s boys see Trump acting out, some will feel their own worst instincts validated. But for others, the idea of “being a man” might mean distancing themselves from his kind of behavior. I do believe that men—and women—are less likely to assert power by denigrating and dominating others when they have a sense of real agency in their lives. It may not be helpful to talk about the end of men, or the rising dominance of women, but rather to remember that for all of us—men, women and transgender—our ability to manifest prosocial behavior depends a lot on having a sense of power and purpose in our lives. Growing inequality, the gig economy, strangling oligopolies, widespread poverty, a shrinking middle class, and government policies geared to appease the rich do not promote this outcome.

For those who reject Donald Trump, figuring out how to achieve a better life for everyone in our society instead of condemning “deplorables” is, in my opinion, a more productive way to go. The co-creation of a more peaceful and fulfilling world requires our most dedicated efforts in imagination, connection and listening to those who do not share our particular vision. Homo Obnoxious will only have the last word if we forget our common humanity.

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This site teaches an understanding of reality. Reality is brutal. Death is often brutal. And if death isn't brutal for the way it happens, then it is still brutal as a fact of life. We are all goners.

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Queensland votes to equalise age of consent for all sexual acts

16 September 2016 - The Guardian

The age of consent for all sexual acts in Queensland will be standardised at 16 after the state’s parliament voted to lower the age of consent for anal sex from 18.

The criminal code will also be amended to replace references to “sodomy” with “anal intercourse” after the Queensland Aids Council said the former term had connotations of outdated laws and moral standards.

Queensland is the only state in Australia to have different legal ages of consent for anal and vaginal sex.

The health minister, Cameron Dick, said the amendments were aimed at improving sexual health.

“Too often the conversation about the age of consent has focused on morality and, worse still, on criminality,” he told parliament. “[With these amendments] we remove a discriminatory provision from our statute books and support the sexual health and wellbeing of young Queenslanders.”

The Liberal National party did not oppose the changes but expressed concerns about how young people would be educated about them.

“We do need certainty and clarity from the government as to how it will educate the 16 to 17-year-old cohort around these changes,” the opposition’s health spokesman, John-Paul Langbroek, said.

But the federal LNP Queensland backbencher George Christensen said on Facebook the change in the law opened the way for 16-year-olds to be “groomed” by much older men.

The Queensland Aids Council’s executive director, Michael Scott, welcomed the change, saying an unequal age of consent had been a barrier to equal access to healthcare.

“We are concerned that, with the current inequality of age of consent, young people who are sexually active are reluctant to access sexual health services including HIV and other STI testing and preventative health education for fear of being prosecuted,” he said.

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You probably have to look at imagery of death and dying regularly to stay focused on what really counts in life: great sex before you are gone anyway.

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A New Way to Prevent Awareness Under Anesthesia

Healthline News

Slow brain waves reveal precisely when a patient loses awareness while under anesthesia, and could prevent the small percentage of cases in which patients are "awake" during surgery.

Being aware of what's happening during surgery and even feeling the pain seems like an unthinkable nightmare. Isn't that what anesthesia is for?

But it does happen in up to one percent of surgeries involving high-risk patients, according to research published in 2011, and affects between 20,000 and 40,000 patients annually in the U.S. alone. Now, scientists from the University of Oxford in the U.K. believe they've found a way to put an end to this disturbing statistic.

Using EEG brain monitoring and MRI imaging scans, the researchers discovered that people lost awareness when low-frequency electrical waves, also called “slow waves,” enveloped the brain. When the waves reached a plateau, sensory signals no longer reached the thalamocortical regions, which are the parts of the brain linked to conscious awareness.

“Awareness in anesthesia is a 'never event'—it isn't good enough for it to be rare,” Roisin Ní Mhuircheartaigh, one of the researchers, told Healthline. “Our goal is to allow anesthesiologists to look at a patient's brain activity and know with confidence that [he or she] is safely asleep.”

The researchers have applied for a patent on their findings and are looking into developing better monitoring equipment for patients under anesthesia. They are the second group of scientists this year to do so. Earlier this year, researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Boston University published their findings on slow waves and unconsciousness.

“They looked at EEG, too, but have focused on the relationship between slow waves and alpha activity,” Catherine Warnaby, another Oxford researcher, told Healthline. “A key difference is that we have looked at slow wave saturation and have the FMRI evidence to support that this state represents a state of perception loss.” Changing the Standards for Anesthesia

Warnaby stressed that anesthesia is very safe, but little is known about how it works in the brain. In patients with severe health problems, too much anesthesia can adversely affect their heart or lungs. Elderly patients may experience severe confusion after an operation if given too much anesthesia.

“We think that this has great potential to become an individualized marker for delivering anesthesia during surgery,” Warnaby said. “If we can prove further that this saturation relates to the point where people lose awareness of the outside world, it may change the way that anesthetics are delivered worldwide. Anesthesiologists would be able to give anesthetics to achieve this saturation level and know that they were giving each individual just the right amount of the drug.”

Learn About the Risks and Benefits of Anesthesia During Delivery »

The research could also help resolve other riddles of the brain, Warnaby added. "Our findings could have implications for all sorts of altered states and disorders of consciousness, such as locked-in syndrome or persistent vegetative state."

In both the Oxford and U.S. research, scientists experimented with the common anesthetic, propofol.

There are EEG monitors available to assess the depth of anesthesia, although there isn't much evidence that these methods are better than traditional monitoring at reducing awareness during surgery, Warnaby said.

The next step is to perform further experiments to recreate a surgical setting. Researchers will look at how other drugs used during surgery—such as painkillers—affect slow waves during anesthesia.

“Depending on the operation, anesthesiologists have to give drugs that block muscle function, 'paralyzing drugs,'” Mhuircheartaigh said. “If inadequate anesthetic drugs are given while the patient can't move to let us know they're awake, awareness can occur.”

Like Warnaby, Mhuircheartaigh stressed the rarity of these cases, especially in healthy people. “However, rare isn't good enough,” she told Healthline. “We hope that by looking at this key process in the brain we can be sure that the patient can't perceive any surgery.”

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The Torture Techniques Used After 9/11 Came Straight From This Military Manual

The foundation of the "enhanced interrogation" program used by the Bush administration after 9/11 is a torture manual used to train U.S. military personnel to withstand brutal interrogation techniques if captured by the enemy during wartime, as reported by Jason Leopold and Jeffrey Kaye at Truth-out.org.

The 37-page document document, called the Pre-Academic Laboratory (PREAL) Operating Instructions, was originally prepared by the Department of Defense's (DOD) Joint Personnel Recovery Agency (JPRA) and used by instructors in the JPRA's Survival Evasion Resistance Escape (SERE) in role-playing scenarios with U.S. military personnel.

Air Force Col. Steve Kleinman, a career intelligence officer considered one of the DOD's best interrogators as well as a former SERE instructor and director of intelligence for JPRA's teaching academy, said that using these teaching techniques in real-life interrogations amounts to torture.

From Truthout:

"In SERE courses, we emphatically presented this interrogation paradigm as one that was employed exclusively by nations that were in flagrant violation of the Geneva Conventions and international treaties against torture," Kleinman said. "We proudly assured the students that we - the United States - would never resort to such despicable methods."

After several meetings of top Bush administration officials, seven techniques from the PREAL manual — attention grasp, walling, facial hold, facial slap, cramped confinement, wall standing and stress positions — ended up in the August 2002 legal opinion of Justice Department attorney John Yoo and Assistant Attorney General Jay Bybee that is widely referred to as the "torture memo."

Administration officials also chose to enhance the intensity of these techniques: the PREAL manual states that "The maximum time allowed for a student to be in cramped confinement in 20 minutes," but the Yoo memo states that confinement "in the larger space can last up to eighteen hours; for the smaller space confinement lasts no more than two hours."

They also chose to add three methods of interrogation: insects placed in a confinement box, sleep deprivation and waterboarding.

Waterboarding, the most controversial technique used on 9/11 suspects, was drawn from other SERE documents the CIA and DOD obtained from JPRA, according to an investigation by the Senate Armed Services Committee and reported by Truthout.

Khalid Shaik Mohammed — who was officially charged this week with planning the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks — was waterboarded 183 times in March 2003, and suspected Al Qaeda operative Abu Zubaydah was waterboarded at least 83 times in August 2002, according to a 2005 Justice Department legal memo.

More than two decades ago, psychologist Bruce Jessen took notes on the PREAL techniques for a SERE survival-training course and wrote that the purpose of such techniques is a way of gaining "total control" over a prisoner and to make the prisoner feel "completely dependent" on his captors so they would "comply with [their] wishes," according to a previous Truthout investigative report.

From Truthout:

The purpose of such dependence, according to Jessen, who worked with [CIA psychologist James] Mitchell in designing Bush's torture program, was to coerce the prisoner's cooperation, the better to use the prisoner for "propaganda, special favors, confession, etc."

The overall effect is called "learned helplessness," and it is the key difference between experiencing these methods when in training and when captured by an enemy.

The critical distinction, according to Col. Kleinman, is that "detainees have no idea whether interrogators are using to intimidate them or to kill them" whereas SERE students have full confidence that instructors and medical personnel make sure that they won't be injured during sessions.

So whereas the PREAL manual explicitly states that "Maximum effort will be made to ensure that students do not develop a sense of 'learned helplessness'" during training, one of the main goals of the Bush administration's torture program was to induce learned helplessness.

Col. Kleinman has publicly called for a thorough investigation into how and why the savage techniques made it into the interrogation doctrine that guided US-sanctioned operations.

From Truthout:

"This is the guidebook to getting false confessions, a system drawn specifically from the communist interrogation model that was used to generate propaganda rather than intelligence," Kleinman said in an interview. "If your goal is to obtain useful and reliable information this is not the source book you should be using."

A 2006 memo released this week shows that at least one U.S. state department official strongly disagreed with the Bush administration's secret legal interpretation that an international treaty against torture did not apply to CIA interrogations in foreign countries, according The Guardian.

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